Category : Shamseya

Challenges and surprises in community monitored health

One year on from winning one of the IACC Social Entrepreneurs Initiative grants for the MENA region, Ayman Sabae illustrates some of the challenges that he faced – and some of the surprises.

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Categories: Peoples Empowerment, Shamseya, Social Entrepreneurs Initiative, Technology

Phase 2 one year on: Ayman Sabae and his hospital evaluation system

One year on from winning one of the IACC Social Entrepreneurs Initiative grants for the MENA region, Ayman Sabae explains what his project has achieved so far.

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Categories: Citizen Action, Peoples Empowerment, Shamseya, Social Entrepreneurs Initiative

Ayman Sabae and Shamseya in the news

Categories: Shamseya, Social Entrepreneurs Initiative, Youth

Student Activism, Egyptian Healthcare and Gorillas

In early September, I had the opportunity to participate in the 16th International Anti-Corruption Conference (IACC) that took place in Putrajaya, Malaysia. For me, the IACC was not just a conference to learn from the most influential people in the governance and transparency fields, but rather a chance to collaborate with other delegates to find the most effective strategies to stop impunity and hold to account those who benefit from the abuse of power. Participating in this conference has allowed me to explore cost-effective and participatory approaches to strengthen my own work at the Accountability Lab.

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Categories: 16th IACC, Citizen Action, Corruption, Film, IACC Young Journalist, Shamseya, The Accountability Lab, Youth

Q&A with a Changemaker: In Depth

ayman-sabaeTransparency is integral to a functioning health care system. However, 73% of the Egyptian population qualify their medical and health services as corrupt. Ahead of World Health Day, we asked Social Entrepreneur Ayman Sabae about the challanges with creating a system to hold health service providers accountable in Egypt.

What inspired this approach to improving the quality of health care?

This does not hold the provider accountable

In most cases, patients do not have any initial assessment of the quality of service each health facility provides prior to their visit. If they have this luxury, they rely on word of mouth or previous experiences when making their choices about service providers. If the services provided are of poor quality, they may complain or decide not to visit this facility again, but this does not hold the provider accountable nor does this give the consumer any voice that would make the low service quality provided in this facility, visible to other consumers.

Is it a possibility that health care providers will bribe patients to provide favourable reviews?

ShamseyaPatients will not carry out the reviews on their own. Community monitoring will be carried out after basic training on how to carry out the performance appraisal and how to use the tool. Community monitors will be directly supported by our team. In addition, the final data and review of a hospital will be the collective consensual findings of more than one community monitoring group that do not know each other. Data are collected and validated centrally and an additional audit can take place if findings show significant differences.

From our practical experience so far, we have been faced with a most interesting finding

From our practical experience so far, we have been faced with a most interesting finding, however. In our testing of the tool in public hospitals, we have been shocked that public hospital staff and managers rushed to actually SHOW the community inspectors the defects that the hospital has. They were actually keen to document and report these defects in an attempt to getting them fixed. This was the case all the way up to the hospital’s director who blamed higher decision makers in the government for these shortages. READ MORE

Categories: Corruption, Innovation, Shamseya, Social Entrepreneurs Initiative, Youth

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